Covering Sector B (east of Hudson) are Officers Deniz Saglam Deniz.Saglam@nypd.org and Maureen Carey (not pictured) Maureen.Carey@nypd.org

Covering Sector D (west of Hudson) are Officers Kelvin Ozuna Kelvin.Ozuna@nypd.org and Gustavo Montesdeoca. Gustavo.Montesdeoca@nypd.org



Neighborhood Coordination Officers (NCOs) reach out to residents and business owners while on patrol, attend community meetings, and visit schools and houses of worship.  As adjuncts to the detective squads, NCOs can quickly respond to developing incidents. The NYPD's 6th precinct has created four sectors for this program, and Jane Street straddles two of them: Sector D (west of Hudson) and Sector B (east of Hudson). NCOs also participate in NYPD's local Build the Block meetings, a chance to meet with NYPD officers and other city departments to discuss local issues. @JSBANYC will tweet about upcoming meetings, which are also announced via this NYPD site.

NYPD neighborhood outreach —  issues with clubs and restaurants — historic preservation

The NYPD's Neighborhood Coordination Officers

(NCOs) include four officers for Jane Street

​​

Our Community Board 2 (CB2) holds monthly meetings about many local issues. A CB2 hearing is the first step for any club or restaurant applying for a new or renewing liquor or beer/wine license. CB2 sends its opinion to the State Liquor Authority (SLA), which grants or denies the application, commonly known as an "SLA app."


These CB2 hearings are the neighborhood's chance to negotiate with applicants about issues that can impact our quality of life: late-night hours, rooftop dining, DJs, rope lines, promoted events, and music volume. The monthly calendar of all committee meetings is updated on CB2's website. The co-chairs of CB2's  SLA Committee are Robert Ely  and Cormac Flynn.  SLA Applicants are encouraged to meet with neighbors before a hearing date. Contact us to join the mailing list of residents who meet with local restaurant/bar owners. ​


​If you are affected by late-night activity of any kind, it is important to lodge a complaint by calling 311, or going online to 311

Concerned about a new or existing bar, club, or restaurant?

Here's why the JSBA monitors local applications for liquor licenses...and how you can help. Write or attend the meetings of our Community Board 2

Preservation issues in our historic district

Our neighborhood is part of the Greenwich Village Historic District, established 50 years ago  to provide guidelines for building renovation and new builds. A leading preservation advocate is The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, which frequently testifies before NYC's Landmarks Preservation Commission, the body that reviews building applications. The GVSHP also offers cultural programming and archival resources. ​

​More about the Landmarks process: 

Landmarking 101 - What Can They Do Here?
Landmarks Wouldn't Allow That Would They?

How to report a possible Landmarks violation

The Greenwich Village Historic District Designation Report 1969